Proof Points Tagline

Accelerating lifesaving treatments through rapid diagnosis and research.

Specialized Expertise

We offer care for a wide range of infectious diseases, including those occurring from transplant or cancer treatment, HIV/AIDS, tropical diseases and many others.

Excellence, Worldwide

Our infectious disease division is one of the world’s largest. It is ranked fourth globally by the Center for World University Rankings (2017) for its expertise.

Better Care through Research

From large-scale HIV prevention studies to Zika-virus response, our scientific discoveries and lab-based investigations deliver innovative approaches to care.

Featured provider

Meet the provider: Jason Simmons, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Simmons is a board-certified infectious disease physician who is dedicated to providing patients with medical knowledge to make informed decisions about their healthcare. View full bio.

Some of our common services:

Zoonotic diseases are caused by infections that are shared between animals and people. Some examples are bird flu, cat scratch disease and rabies. Our infectious disease specialists can effectively diagnose and treat many types of zoonotic infections.

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Hepatitis C is a viral liver disease that causes redness and swelling of the liver, and sometimes lasting damage in the form of liver fibrosis (scarring) and liver cancer. Without treatment, most people have hepatitis C all their lives. Our specialists offer noninvasive liver fibrosis testing, as well as advanced treatments that can cure hepatitis C infection.

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Sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. We offer same-day screening, diagnosis and treatment for most STIs, rapid testing for HIV and vaccinations for certain STIs. We also offer access to PrEP, a daily pill that can prevent HIV for high-risk individuals.

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A bloodstream infection occurs when bacteria enter the bloodstream, usually as the result of a penetrating injury or severe infection elsewhere. If this happens, the bacteria can cause life-threatening complications such as sepsis or settle in certain body parts or organs. Our specialists can expertly and quickly diagnose and treat this type of infection.

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The human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus kills or impairs cells of the immune system, preventing the body from fighting infections and certain cancers. We offer expert consultation and treatment for HIV and HIV-2, including complicated and multidrug resistant HIV. We also provide social services for people living with HIV, treatment of HIV-related co-infections and HIV prevention.

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Skin and soft tissue infections can range from mild to severe, depending on the scope of the infection and the type of bacteria. We provide expert treatment for hard-to-treat skin infections, including those caused by bacteria such as MRSA that are resistant to standard antibiotics.

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Although bones and joints are usually well-protected, they can become infected. If bacteria enter your bloodstream, you may develop an infection in a nearby structure or if you experience an open fracture or injury. Our specialists can accurately diagnose this type of infection and treat it before complications occur.

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Primary immunodeficiency disorders, which are often inherited, weaken the immune system and allow infections to occur more easily. Our specialists can identify the type of immunodeficiency you have and provide advanced treatment and help you learn how to prevent infection.

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A penetrating injury to any part of the body as the result of an accident or an episode of violence carries the risk of becoming infected. The injury allows bacteria to enter the bloodstream or parts of the body that are usually protected. Our infectious disease specialists are experts at diagnosing and treating these types of infections.

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If bacteria enter your bloodstream, you can experience complications such as endocarditis, an infection of the heart lining or heart valves. Our infectious disease specialists are experts at diagnosing endocarditis and treating it as quickly as possible.

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Some people are at greater risk for developing an infection after surgery, which can cause pain, poor wound healing, need for further treatment and a longer hospital stay. We can help you assess your risk of developing an infection after surgery and expertly treat post-surgical infections.

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Because transplant recipients need to take immunosuppressive medication to reduce the risk of organ rejection, they're more prone to infections. If you're undergoing organ transplant surgery, we can evaluate your risk of infection and help you prevent it. We also manage transplantation of hepatitis-positive hearts and livers into hepatitis-negative recipients. Ours is the only transplant center in the Northwestern United States with a specialized transplant infectious disease (ID) team. We work with you to minimize the risk of infection following the transplant procedure.

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We provide complete pretravel counseling, evaluations and immunizations for individuals planning on travel outside of North America. We also treat a wide range of tropical diseases acquired during travel. We're a Washington State Department of Health authorized provider for yellow fever vaccine.

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Also known as leprosy, this disease can affect the nerves, eyes, skin and lining of the nose. It's not easy to contract, especially in the U.S., and can take up to 20 years to show symptoms. But if left untreated, Hansen's disease can cause nerve damage, paralysis, disfigurement and blindness. Our specialists can diagnose this rare condition and provide effective treatment.

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If you have a structural or functional abnormality of the urinary system, or an underlying health condition, you're more likely to develop complicated or recurrent UTIs. Our infectious disease specialists can provide a comprehensive assessment, diagnosis and individualized treatment plan.

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Tuberculosis, sometimes referred to as TB, is a bacterial infection that usually affects the lungs. Without treatment, permanent lung damage or even death can result. People at higher risk for TB include those who can't access healthcare, live in group settings, use IV drugs, have weakened immune systems and/or are elderly. We offer expert diagnosis and treatment for TB.

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This condition occurs when tuberculosis bacteria escape the lungs and enter the bloodstream, infecting other parts of the body. It's most likely to occur in people with compromised immune systems and can quickly cause tissue damage. Our infectious disease specialists can accurately diagnose extrapulmonary TB and work closely with other specialists to treat it.

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Know when and where to seek help.

If you experience significant changes in your physical or mental functions and fear you have a serious, life-threatening illness or injury that could require emergency medical, surgical or psychiatric attention, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

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You can also go to urgent care for non-life-threatening illnesses and conditions.

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Health News You Can Use

Condition Spotlight

Infectious mononucleosis (mono)

Overview

Infectious mononucleosis is often spread through contact with infected saliva. Symptoms can take four to six weeks to appear and usually don’t last beyond four months. Transmission is impossible to prevent because even symptom-free people can carry the virus in their saliva.

Symptoms

Symptoms may include fever, swollen lymph glands in the neck, armpits and groin, extreme fatigue, sore throat, enlarged spleen, head and body aches, mild liver damage and jaundice. Once contracted, mononucleosis remains dormant in the throat and blood cells for the rest of a person's life.

Risk factors and causes

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis. The cytomegalovirus (CMV) causes a variant of mononucleosis that is milder than EBV infectious mononucleosis. Both EBV and CMV are members of the herpes virus family. Most adults between 35 and 40 years old have been infected with EBV.

Diagnosis

Patient-reported symptoms typically support a mononucleosis diagnosis. The diagnosis is confirmed with blood and other lab tests, including white blood cell count, which isn’t diagnostic. However, the presence of certain white blood cells may support the diagnosis. A positive mononuclear spot test also confirms infectious mononucleosis.

Treatment

Treatment for mononucleosis may include rest (to give the body's immune system time to destroy the virus); drinking plenty of liquids; taking over-the-counter medicine as directed for discomfort and fever; and corticosteroids when necessary to reduce swelling of the throat and tonsils.

Complications

The spleen may enlarge and be at risk of rupturing because of the virus. Both EBV and CMV stay in a person's cells for life, even after the symptoms of the virus are gone. The virus can become active again, but it usually doesn't cause symptoms. Most healthy people who get the CMV virus have no long-term health effects.

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